PRINCETON generations

Ideas and Strategies from the Office of Gift Planning at Princeton University

Tiger-ize Your Assets: Five Takeaways

Reunions panelists

Alumni experts Jennifer Jordan McCall ’78, T. Randolph “Randy” Harris ’72, and Victoria Baum Bjorklund ’73 shared their thoughts on how to “Tiger-ize Your Assets” for the 1746 Society Reunions Panel. Among the tips they offered:

  • Trusts can provide a substantial transfer tax and income tax savings, as well as long-range planning opportunities, including the use of the generation skipping tax exemption.
  • A charitable gift made during your lifetime, rather than in your will or in a revocable trust, allows you to benefit from an income tax charitable deduction.
  • No need for an immediate income tax deduction on assets you plan to give to your heirs and would also like to benefit Princeton or another charity? Consider a “non-grantor charitable lead trust” that will give distributions to charity for a term, and then go to your heirs (often free of estate and gift tax).
  • Philanthropically inclined individuals may find it more efficient to leave highly-taxed assets such as IRAs to Princeton or another charity, and the equivalent value in appreciated stock to family members.
  • Make clear restrictions and conditions you desire through your bequest while you are still alive to avoid the gift failing to meet your intentions.

Watch the video >

The information presented is not intended as legal or financial advice. Please consult your own professional advisors to discuss your specific situation.

2 comments on “Tiger-ize Your Assets: Five Takeaways

  1. Susan Fou
    November 4, 2019

    Thanks for catching that – typo has been fixed!

  2. Rocky Semmes '79
    November 2, 2019

    The English language is constantly changing, morphing through usage. And even proofreading is perhaps changing its degree of importance.

    But still, we are products of Princeton. We need to make the effort to excel:

    – The common and currently accepted spelling of something one intends to do is
    “intention”, not “intension”

    Please refer to the last word of the last bullet in the content above.

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This entry was posted on October 29, 2019 in FALL 2019.

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